Title

Joseph Miller's Tobacco Pipe Tomahawk

Subject

American Indians in Ohio
Pipes
Tomahawks

Description

Blacksmith Christy Hare made this tomahawk tobacco pipe for pioneer settler Joseph Miller (1762-1845). It measures 6.5 by 14 inches (16.51 by 35.56 cm). Miller kept the tomahawk, which he used as both a weapon and a pipe for smoking tobacco, with him, even when attending religious services. He reportedly battered the bowl of the pipe while attempting to shoot a bear in a cave. Joseph Miller was a scout for the federal government, exploring the Northwest Territory and fighting American Indians. He was one of the earliest residents of Gallipolis. Miller was reportedly involved in one of the last fights between settlers and American Indians in Ohio. After the signing of the Treaty of Greenville established peace between the settlers and the American Indians, the government no longer needed scouts. Miller moved to Lawrence County, where he farmed and hunted.

Creator

Hare, Christy

Date

1790 circa

Contributor

Jane & Rosemary, the great granddaughters of Joseph Miller

Format

16.5 cm x 35.5 cm

Coverage

Ohio

Rights

Portsmouth Public Library

Source

Historical object(s) or artifact(s)

Tags

No tags recorded for this item.

Citation

Hare, Christy, “Joseph Miller's Tobacco Pipe Tomahawk,” Local History Digital Collection, accessed June 16, 2019, https://www.yourppl.org/history/items/show/5012.

Output Formats


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